Dugg

December 30, 2007

So Christmas has come and gone, and I have a few updates / things I have read to add here. Well, more than a few…..

Top 10 Reasons Why We Procrastinate

Climate Change Performance Index 2008 Released, US #55

Israel visits US to convince to bomb Iran despite evidence

How much is a Million,Billion,Trillion?

Rolling Stone’s 100 Best Songs of 2007

China passed US as world’s biggest CO2 emitter 6 MONTHS AGO

European Team of Astronomers Say Gliese 581 May be Habitable

House Expected to Pass $70 Billion War Funding Bill

Sixty Foot Scroll of Bush Scandals On Display

U.S.’s Largest Solar-Electric Plant Goes Online (and its military)

Scientists: Time Itself May Be Slowing Down

The Mourning (PIC)

The Top Ten Technology Nostalgia

The Worst Films of 2007

What Should the Torrent Community do in aXXo’s absence?

Linux and Mac computers sweep Amazon’s ‘best of’ 2007

Ok, I think that’s me up to date.

Way too much for me to comment on though. Should be able to keep up again now the festive season is almost over.


An irc conversation

December 17, 2007

[14:14:31] <bankrun> global warming is happening however its causes are cause of changes in the solarsystem
[14:14:52] <PJC> lol bankrun, you need to read more
[14:14:53] <gordonjcp> global warming *might* be happening
[14:14:55] <bankrun> which is changing due to the different constitution of the space its moving into
[14:15:09] <bankrun> at 500.000 km per houre
[14:15:11] <gordonjcp> but if it is, it’s mostly caused by changes in the solar system
[14:15:15] <gordonjcp> bankrun: yup
[14:15:25] <bankrun> which is changing due to the different constitution of the space its moving into gordonjcp
[14:15:26] <President_HuckaB> bankrun: which is due to the face on mars
[14:15:37] <gordonjcp> bankrun: we’re moving into a patch of space with rather less dust and rock between us and the sun
[14:15:39] <bankrun> President_HuckaB: its a egular hill
[14:15:41] <President_HuckaB> constitution of the space? this isn’t start trek
[14:16:02] <gordonjcp> there’s a hill that looks like a face near my house
[14:16:08] <gordonjcp> doesn’t mean it’s actually a face
[14:16:13] <bankrun> gordonjcp: the whole solarsystem is travelling into a different space
[14:16:15] <PJC> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/6290228.stm
[14:16:37] <bankrun> global warming is part of the galactic cycle this time
[14:16:41] <gordonjcp> bankrun: also, the nutation of the earth’s axis is subtly altering the seasons
[14:16:53] <President_HuckaB> earth’s axis of evil , if you will
[14:16:56] <PJC> and that has been taken into account bankrun, read New Scientist, things like that and you will be on the cutting edge of the science behind climate change
[14:16:59] <f15> I’m having my period
[14:17:08] <President_HuckaB> send me your panties
[14:17:28] <gordonjcp> basically if you haven’t passed O-grade physics or its equivalent, you shouldn’t talk about global warming
[14:17:32] <gordonjcp> or nuclear power
[14:17:36] <gordonjcp> or fossil fuels
[14:17:39] <President_HuckaB> whats your take on it gordon
[14:17:44] <President_HuckaB> gbl warming
[14:17:44] <f15> where do you live
[14:17:47] <gordonjcp> or indeed, anything considering the physical world
[14:17:48] <PJC> no doubt about that gordonjcp
[14:18:00] <bankrun> New Study Explodes Human-Global Warming Story http://www.newsmax.com/insidecover/global_warming/2007/12/10/55974.html
[14:18:10] Quit ben has left this server (Nick collision from services.).
[14:18:12] <gordonjcp> President_HuckaB: it’s probably happening to an extent, but the reasons behind it aren’t terribly clear
[14:18:25] <f15> ron paul commands the nwo
[14:18:26] <President_HuckaB> agreed
[14:18:30] <gordonjcp> President_HuckaB: certainly it wouldn’t hurt to pump less pollution into the atmosphere
[14:18:36] <f15> from his bunker w/alex he’s lover
[14:18:42] <PJC> The mechanism for producing such cyclical climate changes is still under discussion;” quoted
[14:18:50] <President_HuckaB> gordonjcp: at the expense of development i’m not so sure
[14:19:08] <President_HuckaB> easy for us to talk we’re in the richest 10%
[14:19:16] <f15> yes
[14:19:27] <f15> who wants to play a guessing game?
[14:19:40] <gordonjcp> President_HuckaB: yeah, but then both the developing world and the developed world need to look at how to develop in a sustainable way
[14:19:45] <f15> I’m thinking of a number between 1 and 2
[14:19:53] <gordonjcp> it’s probably easier for the developing world, because they’ve got a clean slate to start with
[14:19:55] <President_HuckaB> gordon: i think they’re doing their best now
[14:19:59] <bankrun> cosmic rays are the cause it says
[14:20:03] <f15> what is the number
[14:20:10] <PJC> the concensus of scientists throughout the world, it 90% plus is that the global warming we are seeing the beginnings of now is man made
[14:20:16] <President_HuckaB> gordon: there’s no timeouts in development
[14:20:26] <f15> what is the number
[14:20:36] <bankrun> PJC: you favour the global warming TAX ?
[14:20:39] <PJC> sure you get the crack pots who would rather the blame be anywhere else other than on us….
[14:20:41] <f15> what is the number
[14:20:47] <President_HuckaB> the developing world doesn’t have a clean slate since it most falls in the harsh environments on earth
[14:20:52] <President_HuckaB> most of africa is non-arable
[14:20:59] <President_HuckaB> central asia is a windy desert
[14:21:02] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:16] <President_HuckaB> much of russia is permafrost
[14:21:20] <PJC> bankrun: I favour any tax, corporate or public that makes the world ‘livable’ for future generations
[14:21:24] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:25] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:26] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:27] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:28] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:28] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:31] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:33] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:35] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:36] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:38] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:40] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:42] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:44] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:47] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:49] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:51] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:53] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:55] <f15> what is the number
[14:21:57] <gordonjcp> yeah
[14:21:57] <f15> what is the number
[14:22:00] <f15> what is the number
[14:22:03] <f15> what is the number
[14:22:04] <f15> what is the number
[14:22:06] <f15> what is the number
[14:22:09] <Nockian> PJC: not me.
[14:22:15] <gordonjcp> I personally don’t care if environmental restrictions put companies out of business
[14:22:19] <gordonjcp> fuck ’em
[14:22:22] <gordonjcp> adapt or die
[14:22:30] <President_HuckaB> i don’t think any portion of civilization has the luxury to go backwards
[14:23:22] <President_HuckaB> europe sits on its glass house dictating what should be done socially but what are the real effects of curbing development on the third world
[14:23:29] <President_HuckaB> they’ll die faster
[14:23:41] <gordonjcp> no
[14:23:44] <President_HuckaB> stands to reason anyway
[14:23:47] <Nockian> President_HuckaB: how is the Huckabee campaign dealing with the story about Huckabee’s son killing that stray dog by hanging it and slitting its throat? that can’t be good for the campaign..
[14:23:49] <gordonjcp> they need to develop in a way that won’t fuck them over
[14:23:51] <PJC> the US and other countries have their priorites wrong, channel some of the billions used for ‘war’ in countries that have ‘wmd’ and harbor ‘terrorists’ (hahahaha) into something other than killing, I’d rather we take the chance and change our ways now, with regards to climate change, and be wrong, rather than not, and have the senarios turn out to be right
[14:24:08] <President_HuckaB> Nockian: my son’s not running for president
[14:24:08] <gordonjcp> PJC: well yeah
[14:24:19] <Nockian> President_HuckaB: the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree
[14:24:27] <President_HuckaB> speak for yourself
[14:24:35] <Nockian> so that’s his official stance then?
[14:24:39] <gordonjcp> if the US spent a bit more money on sorting out its fuel usage than trying to invent wars then it would be better for everyone
[14:24:41] <President_HuckaB> afaik charles manson’s parents were fine
[14:24:55] <Nockian> President_HuckaB: actually, they were terrible people.. you should look into it
[14:25:05] <President_HuckaB> well hitler’s mother was niec
[14:25:14] <f15> is dvd hardware or software?
[14:25:38] <President_HuckaB> you sound like the type who would blame your parents for your own meager successes or lack there of in life
[14:25:38] <gordonjcp> here’s the US DOT planning on introducing laws that US car manufacturers will need to have an average of 35mpg across their model range
[14:25:47] <PJC> yep gordonjcp, but that wouldn’t create more oil or massive rebuilding contracts for certain people in the administration who happen to be board members etc
[14:25:47] <gordonjcp> wtf, 35mpg?
[14:25:54] <PJC> and thats just scratching the surface
[14:26:02] <gordonjcp> if my car was guzzling 35mpg, I’d suspect something was majorly wrong with it
[14:26:09] <gordonjcp> like maybe an engine fire
[14:26:13] <PJC> lol
[14:26:21] <gordonjcp> or a fist-sized hole in the fuel tank
[14:26:23] <President_HuckaB> i love how the left is up bush’s ass yet putin has carte blanche
[14:26:32] <President_HuckaB> and he’s doing much more damage to the global village
[14:27:17] <President_HuckaB> at least bush and liberals can both agree they are supportive of putin dismantling any freedoms in russia
[14:27:19] <f15> gordonjcp you don’t have a car
[14:27:41] Quit ron_o has left this server (Connection timed out).
[14:28:36] <BlimpMan> great
[14:28:39] <BlimpMan> i just got a bullshit parking ticket
[14:28:41] <BlimpMan> fucking mother fuckers
[14:28:43] <President_HuckaB> spasiba shoi
[14:28:52] <f15> blimpman how can you park a blimp?
[14:28:58] <President_HuckaB> it was me who gave it to you
[14:29:08] <President_HuckaB> you’re in atlanta right
[14:29:09] <bankrun> Study says sun getting hotter http://www.lubbockonline.com/news/092897/study.htm
[14:29:19] <President_HuckaB> especially in the summer
[14:29:45] <bankrun> Things Are Heating Up http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~kaisler/articles/event_horizon/heating.html
[14:30:03] <f15> bankrun: do you know how to swim?
[14:30:07] <President_HuckaB> As much of the U.S. is being blasted by vicious ice storms, a blockbuster report published in a prestigious scientific journal insists that the evidence shows that climate warming is both natural and unstoppable and that carbon dioxide (CO2) is not a pollutant.
[14:30:09] <President_HuckaB> nice.
[14:30:10] Quit nomin has left this server (“Leaving”).
[14:30:12] Quit r420r has left this server (“Leaving”).
[14:30:19] <BlimpMan> i’m so angry
[14:30:28] <skyfolly-home> i am so excited
[14:30:29] <BlimpMan> why does this little parking ticket piss me off so much?
[14:30:34] <bankrun> Strong Evidence Points to Earth’s Proximity to Sun as Ice Age Trigger (8/27/2007) http://www.geologytimes.com/Research/Strong_Evidence_Points_to_Earths_Proximity_to_Sun_as_Ice_Age_Trigger.asp
[14:30:35] <f15> blimpman maybe you shouldn’t fly a blimp
[14:30:38] Join quamster has joined this channel (n=Laura@180.134.121.70.cfl.res.rr.com).
[14:30:45] <f15> aka don’t have a cow man
[14:30:52] <President_HuckaB> man’s entire development revolves around natural catastrophe
[14:31:23] <f15> actually around blimps
[14:31:25] <President_HuckaB> dating to the eruption of mt. toba 74,000 yrs ago
[14:31:28] <PJC> climate change isnt just ‘warming’ it involves changes to regional weather and trends, and an overall world wide temperature rise
[14:31:35] <quamster> did Greenland melt yet?
[14:31:42] <skyfolly-home> melting
[14:31:51] <f15> soon will be gone
[14:31:52] <quamster> ah yes
[14:32:02] <President_HuckaB> manmade global warming is false
[14:32:02] <f15> very soon
[14:32:08] <President_HuckaB> its a boondoggle for the left
[14:32:11] <bankrun> in case there was manmade global warming youd expect the atmosphere to rise in temperature before the surface does
[14:32:22] <skyfolly-home> huge icebergs are floating north from antartica
[14:32:24] <President_HuckaB> manmade global warming is the left’s equivalent of terrorism
[14:32:27] <President_HuckaB> except its fake
[14:32:30] <President_HuckaB> and terrorism is real
[14:32:42] Quit LeerokLacerta has left this server (Remote closed the connection).
[14:32:44] <President_HuckaB> but neither have a significant mortal impact on a large pop
[14:32:46] <PJC> President_HuckaB: and you are on the outside looking in, delusion is a comfortable and warm blanket to be wrapped up in
[14:32:46] <bankrun> but the earths atmosphere isnt that warming
[14:32:50] <skyfolly-home> yea right, and UFO is real
[14:32:56] <President_HuckaB> pjc: you are too
[14:33:02] <PJC> mhmm
[14:33:02] <bankrun> so thats why now they claim its cosmic rays
[14:33:03] <President_HuckaB> you’re just too ignorant to realize or admit
[14:33:21] <quamster> were all gonna die
[14:33:40] <President_HuckaB> now that we’re haveing a record winter, the global warming spinsters are trying to say its not “warming”
[14:33:42] Join LeerokLacerta has joined this channel (i=Leerok@gateway/tor/x-f48436a36085d64c).
[14:33:51] <President_HuckaB> gore sounds like a genius in august don’t he
[14:33:52] <bankrun> beside CO2 is not a very effective greenhouse gas , unlike methane that is isolating heath from the earth
[14:34:07] <skyfolly-home> oh well, many people dun cry until they see the coffins
[14:34:21] <President_HuckaB> fearmongering
[14:34:30] <PJC> terrorists, which terrorists, the USA ups and downs its terror alerts to ensure people like you are always worried about something that isn’t there, terrorist attacks in the USA? Last one was 9/11, surely the world wide web or terror is better than that?
[14:34:35] <bankrun> and methane is spewed out in huge quantities as the methane lakes in siberia melt
[14:34:47] <President_HuckaB> pjc: just like global warming is used on people like you
[14:34:51] <deff> global warming is a reptilian conspiracy anyway
[14:34:52] <PJC> as for global warming, yeah its not in your face now, but I like to think of people and a generation other than mine
[14:35:01] <President_HuckaB> fear mongering is fear mongering
[14:35:13] <President_HuckaB> yeah terrorism is sold the same way
[14:35:19] <President_HuckaB> on a long term , results-free basis
[14:35:20] <PJC> not really President_HuckaB, science speaks, the US government doesnt hold any sway with me
[14:35:32] <PJC> wmd in Iraq?
[14:35:33] <President_HuckaB> g.warming is your sides version of fear mongering
[14:35:35] <BlimpMan> i just filed an appeal
[14:35:36] <bankrun> so at least we can be sure that if the earht warms is warms at ever increasing speeds
[14:35:36] <skyfolly-home> why is it so hard to convince people into believing the world is getting warmer and warmer?
[14:35:37] <BlimpMan> i should be str8
[14:35:41] <PJC> terror attacks iminent?
[14:35:41] <President_HuckaB> science doesnt speak
[14:35:53] <President_HuckaB> the U N isn’t science
[14:35:56] <skyfolly-home> is saving that big deal?
[14:36:06] <bankrun> so thats why the scientists cannot predict too far ahead, they forgot for instance the methane lakes in siberia
[14:36:22] <President_HuckaB> bankrun is providing material sources
[14:36:23] <PJC> like i say, you are free to your delusions, I prefer common sense and current science over Bush
[14:36:28] <President_HuckaB> unlike pjc with wild speculation
[14:36:59] <PJC> i see lol
[14:37:00] <bankrun> and thats also why any predictions of future warmings will be underestimated
[14:37:11] <President_HuckaB> global warming is a boondoggle
[14:37:15] <President_HuckaB> and they are trying to save it
[14:37:24] <President_HuckaB> its guaranteed money
[14:37:33] <deff> lol
[14:37:35] <President_HuckaB> from corporations, all the better according to socialists
[14:37:36] <bankrun> and over time the differences between the herren scientists and the reallife situation will get worse
[14:37:37] <deff> money from what
[14:37:48] <deff> how exactly do you monetize on global warming
[14:37:49] <bankrun> so they have to adapt and adapt
[14:38:03] <President_HuckaB> university/research funding
[14:38:17] <President_HuckaB> government appropriations
[14:38:18] <deff> uh that’s a huuge money machine indeed
[14:38:21] <bankrun> but in ten years from now you wont recognize those that advocate the manmade global warming
[14:38:21] <PJC> ok President_HuckaB, you are entitled to your opinions, you go ahead panicing about your terror attacks, and I’ll make a little effort in my household, just incase the made up global warming happens
[14:38:21] <President_HuckaB> wasted on bullshit like that
[14:38:27] <deff> grow a brain, half of it at least
[14:38:31] <President_HuckaB> deff: it is
[14:38:35] <President_HuckaB> huge money actually
[14:38:49] <deff> it isn’t
[14:38:51] <President_HuckaB> there are multi million dollar grants
[14:38:54] <President_HuckaB> for research
[14:38:57] <deff> couple of millions is peanuts
[14:39:00] <President_HuckaB> especially when someone drops the g-bomb
[14:39:09] <President_HuckaB> there are hundreds of grants
[14:39:11] <President_HuckaB> get a clue
[14:39:11] <PJC> huge money = the reason the USA doesnt want to commit it targets
[14:39:20] <PJC> *to
[14:39:36] <PJC> the only country that stood in the way of them btw lol
[14:39:37] <skyfolly-home> it is not about global warming, it is about pollution really.
[14:39:44] <deff> billions made on oil or saved by not investing in new technologies are huge money
[14:39:59] <deff> research grants, gimme a break
[14:40:11] <President_HuckaB> you have no education so what would you know
[14:40:17] <President_HuckaB> you sound like a total idiot scoffing at grants
[14:40:22] <skyfolly-home> and you think oil is unlimit?
[14:40:24] <President_HuckaB> you’re totally out of your scope
[14:40:28] <President_HuckaB> you show it
[14:40:35] <bankrun> skyfolly-home: if the UN uses the carbon tax to reduce co2 emissions its not bad at all
[14:40:40] <PJC> how would you know his education President_HuckaB? you are the one who disputes common, well known accpeted science
[14:40:47] <President_HuckaB> co2 isn’t a cause
[14:40:58] <bankrun> however co2 is a pollutant
[14:41:01] <President_HuckaB> reducing it may be meaningless
[14:41:03] <quamster> alan keys said its hot air from most politicians
[14:41:13] <tuxick> traffic pollutes a lot anyway
[14:41:15] <quamster> he might be on to somthing
[14:41:15] <bankrun> not making a mess is always relevant President_HuckaB
[14:41:18] <tuxick> in several ways
[14:41:23] <deff> President_HuckaB: research is peanuts compared to manufacturing and actually implementing those technologies, you are not going to convince me otherwise
[14:41:36] <President_HuckaB> gov’t appropriations also
[14:41:36] <tuxick> smell, noise, chaos in general, ugly roads
[14:41:49] Join ron_o has joined this channel (n=me@12-210-172-47.client.mchsi.com).
[14:42:02] <bankrun> sustainability starts by not wasting
[14:42:06] <President_HuckaB> its the research money thats sets the standard
[14:42:09] <tuxick> i remember when i visited Dublin, all i remember was NOISE
[14:42:16] <tuxick> especially the heavy traffic
[14:42:29] <President_HuckaB> you want chaos, stroll through brazzville
[14:42:35] <President_HuckaB> brazzaville
[14:42:38] <PJC> increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, trap more heat, its a smiple experiment to do. But much easier on a large scale, say a planet for example….
[14:42:52] <skyfolly-home> people should stop bitching about global warming, instead they should emphasize on protecting the environment, we are killing the earth
[14:42:57] <PJC> not to mention methane, which is x20 as potent
[14:42:58] <President_HuckaB> there are dozens of shitty cities you would reject in favor of dublin believe me
[14:43:16] <bankrun> methane!
[14:43:20] <PJC> stopping global warming involves protecting the earth skyfolly-home
[14:43:30] Quit Yakreiter has left this server (“Verlassend”).
[14:43:34] <bankrun> you will fail PJC
[14:43:56] <skyfolly-home> PJC: i know, but these freaks think we are threatening them with sudden death
[14:44:02] <guest1234> niggers
[14:44:10] <skyfolly-home> lol
[14:44:16] <PJC> lol skyfolly-home, typical knee-jerk reaction
[14:44:22] <bankrun> global warming is unstoppable
[14:44:36] <skyfolly-home> PJC: nah, i am taking it easily
[14:44:38] <PJC> bankrun: we might fail, but that doesn’t mean we shouldnt try
[14:44:48] <PJC> i meant them skyfolly-home lol
[14:44:48] <guest1234> PJC, so stop farting so much
[14:44:57] <bankrun> if you think we live in a greenhouse you are wrong , the earth changes
[14:44:57] <skyfolly-home> PJC: oh
[14:45:06] <PJC> guest1234: stop eating meat 😉
[14:45:35] <bankrun> PJC: besides i dont want to life in an artificial environment which has sprouted out of your brain
[14:45:51] <guest1234> PJC, I think the foods which are high in fiber causes one to fart a lot, not the meats
[14:46:02] <skyfolly-home> nah, we just care for our next generation
[14:46:18] <bankrun> PJC: i would rather consider people like you a threat to nature
[14:46:30] <bankrun> PJC: no in fact i do
[14:46:33] <skyfolly-home> if the world isn’t this fucked up, i would consider having one more baby
[14:46:42] <PJC> guest1234: I meant methane produced by the farmin industry, anyways. like I say, you are entitled to your opinion, carry on as you are. but I’m entitled to mine
[14:46:59] <bankrun> PJC: always regulating our world into what the wheater should be or should not be
[14:47:18] <PJC> bankrun: I’m guessing that yopu are one of those people who thinks anyone who doesnt agree with you is a threat to anything and everything you are discusdsing
[14:47:52] <bankrun> PJC: im telling you you want to fuck with our environment into creating some artificial world
[14:47:57] <f15> skyfolly-home, are you a female?
[14:48:04] <PJC> bankrun: we are already doing that
[14:48:07] <skyfolly-home> f15: lol, sounds reasonable
[14:48:13] <bankrun> PJC: you dont know that for sure
[14:48:23] <bankrun> PJC: but already you know the solutions
[14:48:30] <skyfolly-home> i am a male, altough with small dick
[14:48:38] <bankrun> PJC: change the whole damn globe is your solution
[14:48:41] <bankrun> haha
[14:48:56] <f15> ha
[14:49:11] <bankrun> skyfolly-home: there are some trolls in this room
[14:49:11] <f15> I have largest penis in channel 5 inches
[14:49:16] <PJC> i dont know that the human race is using our resources faster than they can be replenished and that we are putting greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere faster than the earth can reabsorb them, causing a chain reaction of consequences? yes, i do know that
[14:49:24] <guest1234> You ought to be using farm animal dropping as a fuel
[14:49:24] <skyfolly-home> it is not about changing, it is about prevention, people
[14:49:26] Join potato_ has joined this channel (n=potato@124-169-102-252.dyn.iinet.net.au).
[14:49:38] <bankrun> PJC: and so you fix the results of the causes ?
[14:49:48] <skyfolly-home> why you wear a condom while fucking around
[14:49:49] <bankrun> PJC: by changing the whole globe to your likings ?
[14:49:50] <guest1234> You know, use a cow shit to heat up your furnace instead of wood
[14:49:52] <PJC> bankrun: yes, change the whole way we use are world
[14:49:58] <PJC> *our
[14:50:05] <skyfolly-home> diseases are fucking natural way to die
[14:50:15] Join jumpatrain has joined this channel (i=tabac@gateway/gpg-tor/key-0xB9002659).
[14:50:23] <f15> skyfolly-home, mental ones
[14:50:25] <guest1234> skyfolly-home, you cheat on your wife a lot?
[14:50:29] <bankrun> PJC: if you think co2 is the problem then fix that
[14:50:38] <skyfolly-home> guest1234: i cheat on yr mom
[14:50:44] <casanova-> The opening ceremony of the Pentagon as the ministry of defence in the USA was on September 11th.
[14:50:51] <guest1234> skyfolly-home, you do cheat on your wife often, right?
[14:50:59] <skyfolly-home> guest1234: nope
[14:51:06] <f15> casanova- lulz
[14:51:09] <guest1234> skyfolly-home, just once in a while?
[14:51:10] <PJC> I can’t on my own, but hopefully the world will come to realise, as it is now, when 140+ countries sign a treaty promising to change how we do things
[14:51:16] <skyfolly-home> guest1234: never
[14:51:18] <casanova-> f15 that’s true just wiki it over
[14:51:22] <bankrun> PJC: but to change the whole world around it is ridiculous and the results wont be desirable
[14:51:41] <PJC> bankrun: you say that with such conviction, have you do it already?
[14:51:47] <PJC> *done
[14:51:53] <casanova-> Also, the founding cornerstone of the WTC in NYC was laid on a September 11th.
[14:51:54] <f15> casanova- is it the word of the lord?
[14:52:00] <skyfolly-home> so i mean preventing global warming is not trying to change the world, just prevent it from dying
[14:52:23] <f15> casanova- OMG OMG OMG OMG OMG
[14:52:32] <PJC> indeed skyfolly-home
[14:52:40] <bankrun> fixing causes is one of mankinds greatest waisted efforts up until this day in history
[14:52:50] <bankrun> eh
[14:52:56] <bankrun> fixing results i mean
[14:53:03] <f15> casanova-, do you write for wikipedia?
[14:53:04] <casanova-> The state of Israel followed an invasion of British naval troops in palestine, beginning on September 11th. 19222
[14:53:15] <PJC> well, you give up before even starting bankrun, thats not in my nature however
[14:53:20] <guest1234> f15, I do, don’t you?
[14:53:31] <skyfolly-home> if you are stuck in the desert with few water, would you drink it in one day or sip bit by bit?
[14:53:39] <f15> I wrote the disambiguation page for f15
[14:53:54] <bankrun> PJC: no i dont waiste energy and time on fixing problems, id rather fix the causes
[14:54:06] <tuxick> skyfolly-home: i’d drink it all and then privatize water supplies!
[14:54:07] <guest1234> I try to lock my edits as much as possible so the morons can’t fuck it up
[14:54:26] <skyfolly-home> tuxick: then you’d die in one day
[14:54:30] <f15> guest1234, what’s your problem with the mormons?
[14:54:31] <casanova-> The country which has the richest copper reserves in the World, a holy land of the Incas, Chile, experienced a fascist revolution with Gen. Augusto Pinochet, which resulted in the birth of the modern computer industry… on September 11th. 1973
[14:54:49] <skyfolly-home> casanova-: lol
[14:55:02] <guest1234> f15, because it’s a cult?
[14:55:10] <PJC> bankrun: I think you missed the point, the idea is to fix the causes
[14:55:15] Nick potato_ is now known as potato__.
[14:55:17] <casanova-> Coincidence?
[14:55:21] <f15> casanova-, bogus?
[14:55:31] Quit bassgoon has left this server (“Leaving”).
[14:55:32] <casanova-> no the dates are correct
[14:55:32] <PJC> causes of global warming
[14:55:44] <guest1234> f15, they believe that they’re truly the “saved” ones, and rest of the people are non-factors to them
[14:56:08] <guest1234> f15, they believe the “non-saved” ones do not matter (rest of us)
[14:56:12] <f15> guest1234, so what are they going to do to us?
[14:56:16] <casanova-> Wasn’t there a bill passed on September this month…
[14:56:25] <casanova-> this year
[14:56:26] <casanova-> oop
[14:56:31] <guest1234> f15, Soylent Green?
[14:56:33] <f15> casanova-, the dollar bill
[14:56:46] <casanova-> that was june 1913 wasn’t it?
[14:56:49] <f15> guest1234, what can we do to stop soylent greens?
[14:57:08] <f15> casanova-, no that is yesterday
[14:57:10] <guest1234> f15, sounds like a poorly written bot
[14:57:21] <f15> casanova-, now they got a chip in yer hed
[14:58:03] <f15> guest1234, soylent greens say that golbal warming is going to cause imminent disaster but in fact global warming is natural
[14:58:34] <PJC> i would rather we had tried and be wrong, than to have shrugged our shoulders and be right, there is enough money floating around the global economy to make the changes and cause little or no problems around the world. What would have happened if the billions spent on the war in Iraq had been spent on the issue of global warming, would America and the western world now be under attack, would terrorist attack have increased, would
[14:58:34] <PJC> there be world war 3, would society as we know it be falling apart?
[14:58:43] Quit potato__ has left this server (“Leaving”).
[14:59:13] <skyfolly-home> meh, they just dun get it
[14:59:29] <f15> how about we use the money to buy more money
[14:59:33] <PJC> lol
[14:59:36] <f15> like in that game
[14:59:44] <PJC> Second Life?
[14:59:58] <skyfolly-home> lol, dollar to yen?
[15:00:03] <f15> a dollar costs less than a yugo to produce
[15:00:07] Quit LeerokLacerta has left this server (Remote closed the connection).
[15:00:07] <PJC> lol
[15:00:21] <f15> therefore we could fucking print more dollars for dollars
[15:00:36] <f15> and have infinite moneys
[15:00:42] Join LeerokLacerta has joined this channel (i=Leerok@gateway/tor/x-ebe037da7a781947).
[15:01:15] <f15> LOL


Mario/ Duty/ Optical/ Eee/ CIWayhey/ UK1US0/ , and breath

December 16, 2007

Call of Duty 4 Outsells Super Mario Galaxy

[spoiler]

November 2007 Software Sales
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (Xbox 360) — 1,570,000
Super Mario Galaxy (Wii) — 1,120,000
Assassin’s Creed (Xbox 360) — 980,000
Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock (PlayStation 2) — 967,000
Wii Play w/ Remote (Wii) — 564,000
Mass Effect (Xbox 360) — 473,000
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (PlayStation 3) — 444,000
Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock (Wii) — 426,000
Halo 3 (Xbox 360) — 387,000
Assassin’s Creed (PlayStation 3) — 377,000

[/spoiler]

I own both games, Mario wins hands down with game play over graphics. That’s not to say that COD4 isn’t a brilliant game, but when it comes down to it…..

Student Arrested After Cutting Food With Knife

[spoiler]

An elementary student in Marion County was arrested Thursday after school officials found her cutting food during lunch with a knife that she brought from home, police said.
The 10-year-old girl, a student at Sunrise Elementary School in Ocala, was charged possession of a weapon on school property, which is a felony.
According to authorities, school employees spotted the girl cutting her food while she was eating lunch and took the steak knife from her. The girl told sheriff’s deputies that she had brought the knife to school on more than one occasion in the past. Students told officials that the girl did not threaten anyone with the knife.
The girl was arrested and transported to the Juvenile Assessment Center.

[/spoiler]

It’s the end of the world as we know it. All common sense is lost, and our generation has ring side seats.

Inside the CIA’s notorious “black sites”

[spoiler]

A Yemeni man never charged by the U.S. details 19 months of brutality and psychological torture — the first in-depth, first-person account from inside the secret U.S. prisons.

By Mark Benjamin

The CIA held Mohamed Farag Ahmad Bashmilah in several different cells when he was incarcerated in its network of secret prisons known as “black sites.” But the small cells were all pretty similar, maybe 7 feet wide and 10 feet long. He was sometimes naked, and sometimes handcuffed for weeks at a time. In one cell his ankle was chained to a bolt in the floor. There was a small toilet. In another cell there was just a bucket. Video cameras recorded his every move. The lights always stayed on — there was no day or night. A speaker blasted him with continuous white noise, or rap music, 24 hours a day.The guards wore black masks and black clothes. They would not utter a word as they extracted Bashmilah from his cell for interrogation — one of his few interactions with other human beings during his entire 19 months of imprisonment. Nobody told him where he was, or if he would ever be freed.

It was enough to drive anyone crazy. Bashmilah finally tried to slash his wrists with a small piece of metal, smearing the words “I am innocent” in blood on the walls of his cell. But the CIA patched him up.

So Bashmilah stopped eating. But after his weight dropped to 90 pounds, he was dragged into an interrogation room, where they rammed a tube down his nose and into his stomach. Liquid was pumped in. The CIA would not let him die.

On several occasions, when Bashmilah’s state of mind deteriorated dangerously, the CIA also did something else: They placed him in the care of mental health professionals. Bashmilah believes these were trained psychologists or psychiatrists. “What they were trying to do was to give me a sort of uplifting and to assure me,” Bashmilah said in a telephone interview, through an interpreter, speaking from his home country of Yemen. “One of the things they told me to do was to allow myself to cry, and to breath”
Last June, Salon reported on the CIA’s use of psychologists to aid with the interrogation of terrorist suspects. But the role of mental health professionals working at CIA black sites is a previously unknown twist in the chilling, Kafkaesque story of the agency’s secret overseas prisons.

Little about the conditions of Bashmilah’s incarceration has been made public until now. His detailed descriptions in an interview with Salon, and in newly filed court documents, provide the first in-depth, first-person account of captivity inside a CIA black site. Human rights advocates and lawyers have painstakingly pieced together his case, using Bashmilah’s descriptions of his cells and his captors, and documents from the governments of Jordan and Yemen and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to verify his testimony. Flight records detailing the movement of CIA aircraft also confirm Bashmilah’s account, tracing his path from the Middle East to Afghanistan and back again while in U.S. custody.

Bashmilah’s story also appears to show in clear terms that he was an innocent man. After 19 months of imprisonment and torment at the hands of the CIA, the agency released him with no explanation, just as he had been imprisoned in the first place. He faced no terrorism charges. He was given no lawyer. He saw no judge. He was simply released, his life shattered.

“This really shows the human impact of this program and that lives are ruined by the CIA rendition program,” said Margaret Satterthwaite, an attorney for Bashmilah and a professor at the New York University School of Law. “It is about psychological torture and the experience of being disappeared.”

Bashmilah, who at age 39 is now physically a free man, still suffers the mental consequences of prolonged detention and abuse. He is undergoing treatment for the damage done to him at the hands of the U.S. government. On Friday, Bashmilah laid out his story in a declaration to a U.S. district court as part of a civil suit brought by the ACLU against Jeppesen Dataplan Inc., a subsidiary of Boeing accused of facilitating secret CIA rendition flights.

Bashmilah said in the phone interview that the psychological anguish inside a CIA black site is exacerbated by the unfathomable unknowns for the prisoners. While he figured out that he was being held by Americans, Bashmilah did not know for sure why, where he was, or whether he would ever see his family again. He said, “Every time I realize that there may be others who are still there where I suffered, I feel the same thing for those innocent people who just fell in a crack.”

It may seem bizarre for the agency to provide counseling to a prisoner while simultaneously cracking him mentally — as if revealing a humanitarian aspect to a program otherwise calibrated to exploit systematic psychological abuse. But it could also be that mental healthcare professionals were enlisted to help bring back from the edge prisoners who seemed precariously damaged, whose frayed minds were no longer as pliable for interrogation. “My understanding is that the purpose of having psychiatrists there is that if the prisoner feels better, then he would be able to talk more to the interrogators,” said Bashmilah.

Realistically, psychiatrists in such a setting could do little about the prisoners’ deeper suffering at the hands of the CIA. “They really had no authority to address these issues,” Bashmilah said about his mental anguish. He said the doctors told him to “hope that one day you will prove your innocence or that you will one day return to your family.” The psychiatrists also gave him some pills, likely tranquilizers. They analyzed his dreams. But there wasn’t much else they could do. “They also gave me a Rubik’s Cube so I could pass the time, and some jigsaw puzzles,” Bashmilah recalled.

The nightmare started for him back in fall 2003. Bashmilah had traveled to Jordan from Indonesia, where he was living with his wife and working in the clothing business. He and his wife went to Jordan to meet Bashmilah’s mother, who had also traveled there. The family hoped to arrange for heart surgery for Bashmilah’s mother at a hospital in Amman. But before leaving Indonesia, Bashmilah had lost his passport and had received a replacement. Upon arrival in Jordan, Jordanian officials questioned his lack of stamps in the new one, and they grew suspicious when Bashmilah admitted he had visited Afghanistan in 2000. Bashmilah was taken into custody by Jordanian authorities on Oct. 21, 2003. He would not reappear again until he stepped out of a CIA plane in Yemen on May 5, 2005.

Bashmilah’s apparent innocence was clearly lost on officials with Jordan’s General Intelligence Department. After his arrest, the Jordanians brutally beat him, peppering him with questions about al-Qaida. He was forced to jog around in a yard until he collapsed. Officers hung him upside down with a leather strap and his hands tied. They beat the soles of his feet and his sides. They threatened to electrocute him with wires. The told him they would rape his wife and mother.

It was too much. Bashmilah signed a confession multiple pages long, but he was disoriented and afraid even to read it. “I felt sure it included things I did not say,” he wrote in his declaration to the court delivered Friday. “I was willing to sign a hundred sheets so long as they would end the interrogation.”

Bashmilah was turned over to the CIA in the early morning hours of Oct. 26, 2003. Jordanian officials delivered him to a “tall, heavy-set, balding white man wearing civilian clothes and dark sunglasses with small round lenses,” he wrote in his declaration. He had no idea who his new captors were, or that he was about to begin 19 months of hell, in the custody of the U.S. government. And while he was seldom beaten physically while in U.S. custody, he describes a regime of imprisonment designed to inflict extreme psychological anguish.

I asked Bashmilah which was worse: the physical beatings at the hands of the Jordanians, or the psychological abuse he faced from the CIA. “I consider that psychological torture I endured was worse than the physical torture,” he responded. He called his imprisonment by the CIA “almost like being inside a tomb.”

“Whenever I saw a fly in my cell, I was filled with joy,” he said. “Although I would wish for it to slip from under the door so it would not be imprisoned itself.”

After a short car ride to a building at the airport, Bashmilah’s clothes were cut off by black-clad, masked guards wearing surgical gloves. He was beaten. One guard stuck his finger in Bashmilah’s anus. He was dressed in a diaper, blue shirt and pants. Blindfolded and wearing earmuffs, he was then chained and hooded and strapped to a gurney in an airplane.

Flight records show Bashmilah was flown to Kabul. (Records show the plane originally departed from Washington, before first stopping in Prague and Bucharest.) After landing, he was forced to lie down in a bumpy jeep for 15 minutes and led into a building. The blindfold was removed, and Bashmilah was examined by an American doctor.

He was then placed in a windowless, freezing-cold cell, roughly 6.5 feet by 10 feet. There was a foam mattress, one blanket, and a bucket for a toilet that was emptied once a day. A bare light bulb stayed on constantly. A camera was mounted above a solid metal door. For the first month, loud rap and Arabic music was piped into his cell, 24 hours a day, through a hole opposite the door. His leg shackles were chained to the wall. The guards would not let him sleep, forcing Bashmilah to raise his hand every half hour to prove he was still awake.

Cells were lined up next to each other with spaces in between. Higher above the low ceilings of the cells appeared to be another ceiling, as if the prison were inside an airplane hanger.

After three months the routine became unbearable. Bashmilah unsuccessfully tried to hang himself with his blanket and slashed his wrists. He slammed his head against the wall in an effort to lose consciousness. He was held in three separate but similar cells during his detention in Kabul. At one point, the cell across from him was being used for interrogations. “While I myself was not beaten in the torture and interrogation room, after a while I began to hear the screams of detainees being tortured there,” he wrote.

While he was not beaten, Bashmilah was frequently interrogated. “During the entire period of my detention there, I was held in solitary confinement and saw no one other than my guards, interrogators and other prison personnel,” he wrote in his declaration. One interrogator accused him of being involved in sending letters to a contact in England, though Bashmilah says he doesn’t know anybody in that country. At other times he was shown pictures of people he also says he did not know.

“This is a form of torture,” he told me. “Especially when the person subjected to this has not done anything.”

In his declaration, Bashmilah made it clear that most of the prison officials spoke English with American accents. “The interrogators also frequently referred to reports coming from Washington,” he wrote.

After six months he was transferred, with no warning or explanation. On or around April 24, 2004, Bashmilah was pulled from his cell and placed in an interrogation room, where he was stripped naked. An American doctor with a disfigured hand examined him, jotting down distinctive marks on a paper diagram of the human body. Black-masked guards again put him in a diaper, cotton pants and shirt. He was blindfolded, shackled, hooded, forced to wear headphones, and stacked, lying down, in a jeep with other detainees. Then he remembers being forced up steps into a waiting airplane for a flight that lasted several hours, followed by several hours on the floor of a helicopter.

Upon landing, he was forced into a vehicle for a short ride. Then, Bashmilah took several steps into another secret prison — location unknown.

He was forced into a room and stripped naked again. Photos were taken of all sides of his body. He was surrounded by about 15 people. “All of them except for the person taking photographs were dressed in the kind of black masks that robbers wear to hide their faces,” Bashmilah wrote in the declaration.

He was again examined by a doctor, who took notations on the diagram of the human body. (It was the same form from Afghanistan. Bashmilah saw his vaccination scar marked on the diagram.) The doctor looked in his eyes, ears, nose and throat.

He was then thrown into a cold cell, left naked.

It was another tiny cell, new or refurbished with a stainless steel sink and toilet. Until clothes arrived several days later, Bashmilah huddled in a blanket. In this cell there were two video cameras, one mounted above the door and the other in a wall. Also above the door was a speaker. White noise, like static, was pumped in constantly, day and night. He spent the first month in handcuffs. In this cell his ankle was attached to a 110-link chain attached to a bolt on the floor.

&amp;amp;lt;a href=”http://judo.salon.com/RealMedia/ads/click_nx.cgi/www.salonmagazine.com/news/content/large.html@x10″&amp;amp;gt;&amp;amp;lt;img src=”http://judo.salon.com/RealMedia/ads/adstream_nx.cgi/www.salonmagazine.com/news/content/large.html@x10&#8243; width=”300″ height=”250″ border=”0″ alt=”” /&amp;amp;gt;&amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;gt;The door had a small opening in the bottom through which food would appear: boiled rice, sliced meat and bread, triangles of cheese, boiled potato, slices of tomato and olives, served on a plastic plate.Guards wore black pants with pockets, long-sleeved black shirts, rubber gloves or black gloves, and masks that covered the head and neck. The masks had tinted yellow plastic over the eyes. “I never heard the guards speak to each other and they never spoke to me,” Bashmilah wrote in his declaration.He was interrogated more. Bashmilah recalls an interrogator showing him a lecture by an Islamic scholar playing on a laptop. The interrogator wanted to know if Bashmilah knew who the man was, but he did not. It was in this facility that Bashmilah slashed his wrists, then went on his hunger strike, only to be force-fed through a tube forced down his nose.

The CIA seems to have figured out that Bashmilah was not an al-Qaida operative sometime around September 2004, when he was moved to another, similar cell. But there was no more white noise. And while his ankles were shackled, he wasn’t bolted to the floor with a chain. He was allowed to shower once a week. He was no longer interrogated and was mostly left alone.

Bashmilah was given a list of books he could read. About a month before he was released, he was given access to an exercise hall for 15 minutes a week. And he saw mental healthcare professionals. “The psychiatrists asked me to talk about why I was so despairing, interpreted my dreams, asked me how I was sleeping and whether I had an appetite, and offered medications such as tranquilizers.”

On May 5, 2005, Bashmilah was cuffed, hooded and put on a plane to Yemen. Yemeni government documents say the flight lasted six or seven hours and confirm that he was transferred from the control of the U.S. government. He soon learned that his father had died in the fall of 2004, not knowing where his son had disappeared to, or even if he was alive.

At the end of my interview with Bashmilah, I asked him if there was anything in particular he wanted people to know. “I would like for the American people to know that Islam is not an enemy to other nations,” he said. “The American people should have a voice for holding accountable people who have hurt innocent people,” he added. “And when there is a transgression against the American people, it should not be addressed by another transgression.”

[/spoiler]

Asus Eee PC 701 Review

The little machine i own gets more glowing reviews. Stuck on what to buy someone this xmas, or even a treat for yourself? Look no further, that is if you are lucky enough to find somewhere that has them in stock….

Which side is the window on?

[spoiler]

[/spoiler]

Answers on a postcard please…. or the comments section.

Just…… wow!

And finally: UK 1 – USA 0

[spoiler]

Yesterday, the World Bank reported that the US has lost its status as the largest donor to the Bank’s main fund for poor countries, as Britain secured a record amount of aid with a pledge of increased funding.
Britain pledged $4.2 billion for the period from July 2008 through June 2011, after negotiations that began in March in Paris and ended with two rounds of talks in Berlin.
What does it mean to the US? Firstly, losing its position as the top donor could weaken Washington’s influence over the World Bank, which is the largest provider of development assistance to poor countries, and over policies that determine the cash flow.
The US pledged a very substantial contribution but is now down to second place after Britain,
A total of 45 donor countries, the highest number ever, promised a record total of $25.1bn at the Berlin talks, with a further $16.5bn coming from the bank and previous donor pledges. The total of $41.6bn represents an increase of $9.5bn over the previous funding period and will support around 80 countries, with a focus on African countries.
Read
“The donor community has demonstrated its full commitment to helping countries overcome poverty and achieve sustainable growth, especially in Africa,” World Bank President Robert Zoellick said.
However, contributions by some other countries also appear inflated when calculated in the US currency—which is running currently on a weakening dollar—and the talks were also complicated by slowing economic growth in rich nations. In the meantime, the bank’s mission is widening, with governments demanding more help in developing sophisticated economies and markets.
The US, despite having an economy six times as big as Britain’s, has been keen to hold on to its number one spot as the bank’s largest donor but has also been struggling in recent times with stretched budgets caused by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

[/spoiler]

The US spends enough money bombing and invading places, then rebuilding what they have bombed. Why should we expect them to spend more money!

Unless…….

It’s to bomb, invade and kill people and pay for the repairs. Or at least give the repair job to friends of the administrations companies so they can get rich… I mean richer.

Bin Ladens men in Iraq? Not till Sadam was taken out for possessing weapons that didn’t exist….. Don’t get me started lol


Some News…

December 15, 2007

Top 11 Warmest Years On Record Have All Been In Last 13 Years

ScienceDaily (Dec. 13, 2007) — The decade of 1998-2007 is the warmest on record, according to data sources obtained by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The global mean surface temperature for 2007 is currently estimated at 0.41°C/0.74°F above the 1961-1990 annual average of 14.00°C/57.20°F.

[spoiler]

The University of East Anglia and the Met Office’s Hadley Centre have released preliminary global temperature figures for 2007, which show the top 11 warmest years all occurring in the last 13 years. The provisional global figure for 2007 using data from January to November, currently places the year as the seventh warmest on records dating back to 1850.
Other remarkable global climatic events recorded so far in 2007 include record-low Arctic sea ice extent, which led to first recorded opening of the Canadian Northwest Passage; the relatively small Antarctic Ozone Hole; development of La Niña in the central and eastern Equatorial Pacific; and devastating floods, drought and storms in many places around the world.
The preliminary information for 2007 is based on climate data up to the end of November from networks of land-based weather stations, ships and buoys, as well as satellites. The data are continually collected and disseminated by the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHS) of WMO’s 188 Members and several collaborating research institutions. Final updates and figures for 2007 will be published in March 2008 in the annual WMO brochure for the Statement on the Status of the Global Climate.
WMO’s global temperature analyses are based on two different sources. One is the combined dataset maintained by both the Hadley Centre of the UK Meteorological Office, and the Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK, which at this stage ranked 2007 as the seventh warmest on record. The other dataset is maintained by the US Department of Commerce’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which indicated that 2007 is likely to be the fifth warmest on record.
Since the start of the 20th century, the global average surface temperature has risen by 0.74°C. But this rise has not been continuous. The linear warming trend over the last 50 years (0.13°C per decade) is nearly twice that for the last 100 years.
According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 4th Assessment (Synthesis) Report, 2007, “warming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global average sea level.”
2007 global temperatures have been averaged separately for both hemispheres. Surface temperatures for the northern hemisphere are likely to be the second warmest on record, at 0.63°C above the 30-year mean (1961-90) of 14.6°C/58.3°F. The southern hemisphere temperature is 0.20°C higher than the 30-year average of 13.4°C/56.1°F, making it the ninth warmest in the instrumental record since 1850.
January 2007 was the warmest January in the global average temperature record at 12.7°C/54.9°F, compared to the 1961-1990 January long-term average of 12.1°C/53.8°F.
Regional temperature anomalies
2007 started with record breaking temperature anomalies throughout the world. In parts of Europe, winter and spring ranked amongst the warmest ever recorded, with anomalies of more than 4°C above the long-term monthly averages for January and April.
Extreme high temperatures occurred in much of Western Australia from early January to early March, with February temperatures more than 5°C above average.
Two extreme heat waves affected south-eastern Europe in June and July, breaking previous records with daily maximum temperatures exceeding 40°C/104°F in some locations, including up to 45°C/113°F in Bulgaria. Dozens of people died and fire-fighters battled blazes devastating thousands of hectares of land. A severe heat wave occurred across the southern United States of America during much of August with more than 50 deaths attributed to excessive heat. August to September 2007 was extremely warm in parts of Japan, setting a new national record of absolute maximum temperature of 40.9°/105.6°F on 16 August.
In contrast, Australia recorded its coldest ever June with the mean temperature dropping to 1.5°C below normal. South America experienced an unusually cold winter (June-August), bringing winds, blizzards and rare snowfall to various provinces with temperatures falling to -22°C/-7.6°F in Argentina and -18°C/-0.4°F in Chile in early July.
Prolonged drought
Across North America, severe to extreme drought was present across large parts of the western U.S. and Upper Midwest, including southern Ontario/Canada, for much of 2007.  More than three-quarters of the Southeast U.S. was in drought from mid-summer into December, but heavy rainfall led to an end of drought in the southern Plains.
In Australia, while conditions were not as severely dry as in 2006, long term drought meant water resources remained extremely low in many areas. Below average rainfall over the densely populated and agricultural regions resulted in significant crop and stock losses, as well as water restrictions in most major cities.
China experienced its worst drought in a decade, affecting nearly 40 million hectares of farmland. Tens of millions of people suffered from water restrictions.
Flooding and intense storms
Flooding affected many African countries in 2007. In February, Mozambique experienced its worst flooding in six years, killing dozens, destroying thousands of homes and flooding 80,000 hectares of crops in the Zambezi valley.
In Sudan, torrential rains caused flash floods in many areas in June/July, affecting over 410,000 people, including 200,000 left homeless. The strong southwesterly monsoon resulted in one of the heaviest July-September rainfall periods, triggering widespread flash floods affecting several countries in West Africa, Central Africa and parts of the Greater Horn of Africa. Some 1.5 million people were affected and hundreds of thousands homes destroyed.
In Bolivia, flooding in January-February affected nearly 200,000 people and 70,000 hectares of cropland. Strong storms brought heavy rain that caused extreme flooding in the littoral region of Argentina in late March/early April. In early May, Uruguay was hit by its worst flooding since 1959, with heavy rain producing floods that affected more than 110,000 people and severely damaged crops and buildings. Triggered by storms, massive flooding in Mexico in early November destroyed the homes of half a million people and seriously affected the country’s oil industry.
In Indonesia, massive flooding on Java in early February killed dozens and covered half of the city of Jakarta by up to 3.7 metres of water. Heavy rains in June ravaged areas across southern China, with flooding and landslides affecting over 13.5 million people and killing more than 120. Monsoon-related extreme rainfall events caused the worst flooding in years in parts of South Asia. About 25 million people were affected in the region, especially in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. Thousands lost their lives. However, rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon season (June-September) for India was, generally, near normal (105% of the long-term average), but with marked differences in the distribution of rainfall in space and time.
A powerful storm system, Kyrill, affected much of northern Europe during 17-18 January 2007 with torrential rains and winds gusting up to 170km/h. There were at least 47 deaths across the region, with disruptions in electric supply affecting tens of thousands during the storm.
England and Wales recorded its wettest May-July period since records began in 1766, receiving 406 mm of rain compared to the previous record of 349 mm in 1789. Extensive flooding in the region killed nine and caused more than US$6 billion in damages.
Development of La Niña
The brief El Niño event of late 2006 quickly dissipated in January 2007, and La Niña conditions became well established across the central and eastern Equatorial Pacific in the latter half of 2007.
In addition to La Niña, unusual sea surface temperature patterns with cooler than normal values across the north of Australia to the Indian Ocean, and warmer than normal values in the Western Indian Ocean, were recorded. These are believed to have modified the usual La Niña impacts in certain regions around the world.
The current La Niña is expected to continue into the first quarter of 2008 at least.
Devastating tropical cyclones
Twenty-four named tropical storms developed in the North-West Pacific during 2007, below the annual average of 27. Fourteen storms were classified as typhoons, equalling the annual average. Tropical cyclones affected millions in south-east Asia, with typhoons Pabuk, Krosa, Lekima and tropical storms like Peipah among the severest.
During the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, 14 named storms occurred, compared to the annual average of 12, with 6 being classified as hurricanes, equalling the average. For the first time since 1886, two category 5 hurricanes (Dean and Felix) made landfall in the same season.
In February, due to tropical cyclone Gamède, a new worldwide rainfall record was set in French La Reunion with 3,929 mm measured within three days.
In June, cyclone Gonu made landfall in Oman, affecting more than 20,000 people and killing 50, before reaching the Islamic Republic of Iran. There is no record of a tropical cyclone hitting Iran since 1945.
On 15 November, tropical cyclone Sidr made landfall in Bangladesh, generating winds of up to 240 km/h and torrential rains. More than 8.5 million people were affected and over 3,000 died. Nearly 1.5 million houses were damaged or destroyed. Often hit by cyclones, Bangladesh has developed a network of cyclone shelters and a storm early-warning system, which significantly reduced casualties.
Australia’s 2006/2007 tropical season was unusually quiet, with only five tropical cyclones recorded, equalling the lowest number observed since at least 1943-44.
Relatively small Antarctic ozone hole
The 2007 Antarctic ozone hole was relatively small due to mild stratosphere winter temperatures. Since 1998, only the 2002 and 2004 ozone holes were smaller. In 2007, the ozone hole reached a maximum of 25 million square kms in mid-September, compared to 29 million square kms in the record years of 2000 and 2006. The ozone mass deficit reached 28 megatonnes on 23 September, compared to more than 40 megatonnes in the record year of 2006.
Record-low Arctic sea ice extent opened the Northwest Passage
Following the Arctic sea ice melt season, which ends annually in September at the end of the northern summer, the average “sea ice extent” was 4.28 million square kms, the lowest on record. The “sea ice extent” at September 2007 was 39% below the long-term 1979-2000 average, and 23% below the previous record set just two years ago in September 2005.For the first time in recorded history, the disappearance of ice across parts of the Arctic opened the Canadian Northwest Passage for about five weeks starting 11 August. Nearly 100 voyages in normally ice-blocked waters sailed without the threat of ice. The September rate of sea ice decline since 1979 is now approximately 10% per decade, or 72,000 square kms per year.
Sea level rise continues
The sea level continued to rise at rates substantially above the average for the 20th century of about 1.7 mm per year. Measurements show that the 2007 global averaged sea level is about 20 cm higher than the 1870 estimate. Modern satellite measurements show that since 1993 global averaged sea level has been rising at about 3 mm per year.
Global 10 Warmest Years Mean Global temperature (°C) (anomaly with respect to 1961-1990)
1998 0.52
2005 0.48
2003 0.46
2002 0.46
2004 0.43
2006 0.42
2007(Jan-Nov) 0.41
2001 0.40
1997 0.36
1995 0.28
UK 10 Warmest Years Mean UK Temperature (°C) (anomaly with respect to 1971-2000)
2006 +1.15
2007 (Jan to 10th Dec) + 1.10
2003 + 0.92
2004 + 0.89
2002 + 0.89
2005 + 0.87
1990 + 0.83
1997 + 0.82
1949 + 0.80
1999 + 0.78
Adapted from materials provided by World Meteorological Organization.

[/spoiler]

More fuel for the metaphorical fire.

PS3 one ups Xbox 360 with its DivX support

The Xbox 360 may have beaten Sony to to the punch with regards to supporting the DivX format but it seems that the PS3 will have the last laugh on the matter. First of all, unlike the Xbox 360, the PS3 is DivX certified meaning it will get full DivX functionality. This even allows for developers to utilize the solid form of compression for various in-game cut scenes.

quote:

Last month, DivX announced that the PS3 will soon support DivX, and, this month, Gizmodo met with the company, which shared some interesting details on the big move.

First of all, unlike the Xbox 360, the PS3 is DivX certified. While Microsoft’s console can only playback some DivX files, the PS3 will get full DivX functionality. This includes the ability for game developers to use the very efficient compression format for in-game cut-scenes.

This means DivX video cut scenes will reduce stress on the machine, theoretically allowing for better load times, less power consumption, and less heat output.

News Source: Blorge

Hurrah!  Well ok, I’m not a PS3 fanboy per say, but I do own one.  So in the interests of keeping the inter console wars fresh…. Hurrah!


Deal agreed in Bali climate talks

December 15, 2007

A compromise deal for a new international climate change agenda was agreed at the UN summit in Bali today.The move was hailed by environment secretary, Hilary Benn, as “an historic breakthrough”.

Ministers from around 180 countries were united in accepting the agenda for a global emissions cuts agreement to launch negotiations for a post-2012 agreement to tackle climate change.

Consensus for the road map followed a dramatic U-turn by the US, which had threatened to block the deal at the 11th hour and been booed by other countries.

It dropped its opposition to poorer countries’ calls for technological and financial help to combat the issue.

[spoiler]

Applause

The sudden reversal by the US in the marathon talks which saw the country duelling with European envoys was met with rousing applause.

While it will be two years before a final deal on post-2012 is likely to be struck, countries have been fighting for the kinds of things they want to see on the table for those talks.

Mr Benn said: “This is an historic breakthrough and a huge step forward.

“For the first time ever all the world’s nations have agreed to negotiate on a deal to tackle dangerous climate change.”

He said it was the compelling clarity of the science and the strength of the case for urgent action that has made this agreement possible.

But it was political leadership that made it happen, Mr Benn added.

He continued: “Our changing climate has changed our politics, because we knew that we could not let people down.

“We came here saying we wanted a road map that included every country and covered emission reductions from developed countries and fair and equitable contributions from developing countries.

“We leave here with all of this and more – a groundbreaking agreement on deforestation, and others on adaptation and technology.

“And against predictions these negotiations will be guided by ambitious goals for emission reductions.

“What we have achieved here has never been done before.

“Less than a year ago, many would have said this agreement was impossible.

“Now we must make it work, and in the next two years agree the detail of a comprehensive global climate deal that will take us beyond 2012.”

The agreement follows two weeks of insults, arguments and threatened boycotts and trade sanctions, as countries wrangled over who should take responsibility for cutting carbon pollution

UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon, who returned to Bali as the conference stretched into another day, had earlier said he was “disappointed” at the lack of progress.

A highly emotional Mr Ban had told delegates: “Now the hour is late. It’s time to make a decision.

“You have in your hands the ability to deliver to the people of the world a successful outcome to this conference.”

Ministers worked through the night to hammer out the details of an agenda for the agreement, which will replace the current Kyoto Protocol.

The EU conceded on one of the main sticking points – the inclusion in the road map of a reference of 25% to 40% emissions cuts by developed countries by 2020, which scientists have said are necessary to avoid dangerous climate change.

The EU had insisted the figures were in the document because they are based on the science of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and an ambitious road map was needed.

But the US demanded – and won – their removal, claiming they could “prejudge” outcomes of negotiations over the past two years.

This morning the Europeans accepted a road map in which the targets were missing, as were references to the need for emissions to peak within 10 to 15 years and for global greenhouse gas output to halve by 2050.

Instead the document said countries recognise that “deep cuts in global emissions” will be required, and calls for a “long-term global goal for emissions reductions”.

In turn the US conceded over the issue in the road map of how much developing countries need to do to curb their emissions.

Paula Dobriansky, the head of the US delegation, said: “I think we have come a long way here.

“In this, the United States is very committed to this effort and just wants to really ensure we all act together.

“We will go forward and join consensus.”

Campaigning groups said the deal had been stripped of important targets and hit out at the US’s “wrecking policy”.

Keith Allott, Head of Climate Change at WWF UK, said:

“We are not at all pleased.

“We were looking for a road map with a destination.”

But he praised the talks having been brought back from the brink of collapse, with the alliance of the G77 developing countries with the EU.

He said positive aspects included the beginning of a framework to ramp up the finance to help poorer countries adapt and potential for “real movement” with technology transfer.

Looking ahead, Mr Allott hoped for a new administration in the US.

“We are seeing a dynamic situation in many of the countries,” he said.

“We have had a sea change in Australia.”

Greenpeace said that the agreement had been stripped of the emission reduction targets that humanity needs.

“The Bush administration has unscrupulously taken a monkey wrench to the level of action on climate change that the science demands,” said Gerd Leipold, executive director of Greenpeace International.

“They’ve relegated the science to a footnote.”

Greenpeace said it remains confident that mounting public pressure on every continent will force governments over the next two years to agree “inevitable” deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions.

The group criticised the US’s strategy, saying the Bush administration was “shamed” by the firm resolve of the developing countries China, India, Brazil and South Africa, who came to Bali with concrete proposals.

Nelson Muffuh, a Christian Aid senior climate change policy analyst, said: “For most of the conference, the US delegation in particular proved a major obstacle to progress.

“They appeared to operate a wrecking policy, as though determined to derail the whole process.

“We welcome their last minute agreement to support the consensus in accepting the Bali road map, having said less than an hour earlier that it was unacceptable, and we sincerely hope they are serious in their stated desire to negotiate.

“But the way ahead will be hard. The Bush administration has said throughout that it wants to see developing countries agree to cuts in carbon emissions.

“A number of emerging economies put creative, flexible plans on the table, but will have little incentive to negotiate further until the industrialised world agrees deeper cuts.

“Climate change is already having a devastating impact on the lives of some of the world’s poorest communities through drought and flooding.”

He said the lack of clear targets in the road map leaves them exposed to further catastrophe.

“We were expecting a road map, and we’ve got one,” said Mr Muffuh. “But it lacks signposts and there is no agreed destination.”

A spokesman for the Carbon Markets Association (CMA) welcomed the breakthrough “of a road map to engaging all nations, including the US, in meaningful negotiations toward long-term commitments by 2009.

“The process to 2009 should at a minimum deliver an extension of the first phase binding commitments beyond 2012 as well the engagement of a broader group of nations with binding commitments.”

The US is the only major industrial nation to reject Kyoto.

President George Bush has complained that it would unduly damage the US economy, and emission caps should have been imposed on China, India and other fast-growing developing countries.

The Bush administration favours a voluntary approach with each country deciding how it can contribute in place of internationally negotiated and legally binding commitments.

[/spoiler]

Source

So the US makes some concessions to strike a deal. But not before ‘targets’ are take out of the deal, which in my opinion taints the whole ‘historic moment’. It’s something, but not the everything I was hoping for. And i don’t think I’m the only one.

With emerging economies coming to the fore as major contributors to climate change, fair or not, we in the west need to lead the way and try and compensate for the damage these relatively new, to the climate problem, countries are causing.  Now is the time, and the USA needs to put the world before themselves for a change.


Some Science

December 12, 2007

The best of science, the worst of creationism

In 2000, a popular school textbook called Biology reluctantly dropped it’s prime example of evolution in action – industrial melanism in the peppered moth. Nothing in evolutionary biology had forced the change. The decision was entirely political,made in response to creationist attacks.

The loss of the peppered moth was a blow to science education in the US, as it is one of the easiest to understand examples of evolution by natural selection. So it is heartening to hear that biologists are fighting back. Thanks to their efforts, evidence that the moth is an example of evolution in action is more robust than ever.

This tawdry tale reveals much of what is good about science – and rotten about creationism. Creationists went gunning for the moth after a scientific disagreement over the fine detail of a seminal experiment done in the 1950s. They used the debate to portray the science behind industrial melanism as hopelessly flawed, if not fraudulent.

In response, one scientist patiently redid the experiment – it took him seven years. It is hard to think of another system of thought that is so stringently self-critical and self-correcting.

In science, everything is provisional . There are no preordained answers and fresh ideas are always welcome, so long as their proponents are happy for them to be tested.

That is not how creationists work. They already know the answer. They seek only evidence that confirms their conclusion, and distort or ignore the rest. Such an unreasoned approach is worthless. Creationists will keep trying to undermine the theory of evolution.

All science can do is continue, with dignity, to stick to it’s guns. As with the peppered moth, the best testable explanation will win out.

Conspiracy? Not in China

There’s no stopping a good conspiracy theory. For over 30 years, NASA has faced allegations that it faked the moon landings, and now it is the turn of the Chinese.

In October, the Chinese spacecraft Chang’e 1 entered lunar orbit, and last week the country released its first image of the lunar surface. Within hours of the picture’s release the internet rumour mill leapt into action on various Chinese blogs and forums, casting doubt on it’s validity and saying it bore an uncanny resemblance to a picture released by NASA in 2005.

The Chinese space agency replied that the pictures are similar because they are of the same part of the moon. NASA’s experience with conspiracy theories suggests that denying the rumour will only serve to keep it running. Ouying Ziyuan, chief scientist for the lunar probe, more or less guaranteed this by adding: “There is absolutely no forgery.”

 

Our solar future

In theory, solving the world’s energy problems should be pretty straightforward. Locate a piece of sun-drenched land about half the size of Texas, find a way to capture just 20 per cent of the solar energy that falls there and bingo – problem solved. You have enough power to replace the world’s entire energy needs using the cleanest, most renewable resource there is.

Can it really be that easy? For years, supporters of solar power have heralded every new technological breakthrough as a revolution in the making. Yet time and again it has failed to materialise, largely because the technology was too expensive and inefficient and, unlike alternatives such as nuclear and wind power, no substantial subsidies were available to kick-start a mass transition to solar energy. This time things are different. Aconfluence of political will, economic pressure and technological advances suggests that we are on the brink of an era of solar power.

The prospect of relying on the sun for all our power demands – conservatively estimated at 15 terawatts in 2005 – is finally becoming realistic thanks to the rising price of fossil fuels, an almost universal acceptance of the damage they cause, plus mushrooming investment in the development of solar cells and steady advances in their efficiency. The tried-and-tested method of using the heat of the sun to generate electricity is already hitting the big time but the really big breakthroughs are happening to photovoltaic (PV) cells.

Ever since the first PV cell was created by Bell Labs in 1954, the efficiency with which a cell can convert light into electricity has been the technology’s Achilles’ heel. The problem is rooted in the way PV cells work. At the heart of every PV cell is a semiconducting material, which when struck by a photon liberates an electron. This can be guided by a conductor into a circuit, leaving behind a “hole” which is filled by another electron from the other end of the circuit, creating an electric current.

Photons from the sun arrive at the semiconductor sporting many different energies, not all of which will liberate an electron. Each semiconducting material material has a characteristic “band gap” – an energy value which photons must exceed if they are to dislodge the semiconductor’s electrons. If the photons are too weak they pass through the material, and if they are too energetic then only part of their energy is converted to electricity, the rest into heat. Some are just right, and the closer the photons are to matching the band gap, the greater the efficiency of the PV cell.

Bell Labs discovered that silicon, which is cheap and easy to produce, has one of the best band gaps for the spectrum of photon energies in sunlight. Even so, their first cell had an efficiency of only 6 per cent. For a long time improvements were piecemeal, inching up to the mid-teens at best, and at a cost only military and space exploration programmes could afford. The past decade has seen a sea change as inexpensive cells with an efficiency of 20 per cent have become a commercial reality, while in the lab efficiencies are leaping forward still further.

Last year, Allen Barnett and colleagues at the university of Delaware, Newark, set a new record with a design that achieved 42.8 per cent energy conversion efficiency. Barnett says 50 per cent efficiency on a commercial scale is now within reach. Such designs, married to modern manufacturing techniques, mean costs are falling fast too.

As a result, in parts of Japan, California and Italy, where the retail price of electricity is among the world’s highest, the cost of solar-generated electricity is now close to, and in some cases matches, that of electricity generated from natural gas and nuclear power, says Michael Rogol, a solar industry analyst with Photon Consulting, based in Aachen, Germany. For example, in the US the average price of conventionally generated electricity is around 10 cents per kilowatt-hour. The cost of solar-generated electricity has fallen to roughly double that. This has created a booming market for PV cells – now growing by around 35 per cent annually – and private investors are starting to take a serious interest. The value of stocks in companies whose business focuses primarily on solar power has grown from $40 billion in January 2006 to more than $140 billion today, making solar power the fastest-growing sector in the global marketplace.

George W. Bush has acknowledged this new dawn, setting aside $168 million of federal funds for the Solar America Initiative, a research programme that aims to make the cost of PV technology competitive with other energy technologies in the US by 2015. Rogol thinks Bush’s target is achievable. He says the cost of manufacturing PV equipment has fallen to the point where, in some places, PV-generated electricity could already be produced for less than conventional electricity. Manufacturing PV cells at $1 per watt of generating capacity and the cost should be competitive everywhere.

Perhaps surprisingly, given its less than cloudless skies, one of the countries leading the solar revolution is Germany. In November 2003, amid rising oil and gas prices and growing concern over global warming, its parliament agreed a “feed-in-tariff” programme, which guarantees a market for solar power. Anyone who produces electricity from solar power can sell it to the national grid for between €0.45 and €0.57 per kilowatt-hour, which is almost three times what consumers pay for their electricity, roughly €0.19 per kilowatt-hour. Germany’s power-generating companies are required by law to pay this premium which is guaranteed until 2024. This guarantee has spurred enterprising individuals to invest in solar panels, confident of earning back the cost of their systems.

Source:  New Scientist


Bali draft says all nations must join climate fight

December 9, 2007

By Alister Doyle and Gerard Wynn

NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) – All nations must do more to fight climate change, and rich countries must make deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions to avoid the worst impacts, a draft proposal at United Nations talks said on Saturday.

The four-page draft, written by delegates from Indonesia, Australia and South Africa as an unofficial guide for delegates from 190 nations at the December 3-14 talks, said developing nations should at least brake rising emissions as part of a new pact.

It said there was “unequivocal scientific evidence” that “preventing the worst impacts of climate change will require (developed nations) to reduce emissions in a range of 25-40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020.”

The draft is the first outline of the possible goals of talks on a new global deal to replace the Kyoto Protocol, which binds just 36 developed nations to cut emissions of greenhouse gases by 5 percent below 1990 levels by 2008-12.

“Current efforts … will not deliver the required emissions reductions,” according to the text, obtained by Reuters, that lays out a plan for averting ever more droughts, floods, heatwaves and rising seas.

“The challenge of climate change calls for effective participation by all countries,” it said. The United States is outside the Kyoto pact and developing nations led by China and India have no 2012 goals for limiting emissions.

Echoing conclusions this year by the U.N. climate panel, it said global emissions of greenhouse gases would have to “peak in the next 10 to 15 years and be reduced to very low levels, well below half of levels in 2000 by 2050.”

The draft lays out three options for how to proceed after Bali — ranging from non-binding talks over the next two years to a deadline for adopting a new global pact at a U.N. meeting in Copenhagen in late 2009.

Rich nations should consider ways to step up efforts to curb emissions of greenhouse gases by setting “quantified national emission objectives”, the draft says.

Poor countries should take “national mitigation actions … that limit the growth of, or reduce, emissions,” it says. It adds that “social development and poverty eradication are the first and overriding priorities” for poor nations.

Delegates will report back on Monday with reactions.

Earlier, trade ministers from 12 nations met for the first time on the sidelines of a U.N. climate conference, opening a new front in the global warming battle.

Their two-day discussions ending on Sunday focus on easing tariffs on climate-friendly goods to spur a “green” economy. About 20 finance ministers will join the fringes of the Bali meeting on Monday and Tuesday.

“Climate change solutions open up important opportunities for jobs and trade,” Australian Trade Minister Simon Crean told reporters. Ministers at the trade meeting included those from the United States, Australia, Brazil and India.

Differences over who should take the blame for, and do most to curb, emissions threatened to deadlock the main talks. Canada and Australia joined Japan on Saturday in calling for commitments from some developing countries.

But developing nations would find it “inconceivable” to accept binding targets now, said the U.N.’s climate change chief Yvo de Boer. An alliance of 43 small island states urged even tougher action to fight climate change, saying they risked being washed off the map by rising seas.

Outside the conference centre, Balinese dancers used sticks to burst black balloons labelled “CO2”, the main greenhouse gas.

— For Reuters latest environment blogs click on: blogs.reuters.com/environment/

(Reporting by Gerard Wynn and Alister Doyle, Editing by Tim Pearce)

Just do it….