McClennan

May 28, 2008

As time goes by the reality of world changing events becomes clearer and definitely more honest. That is the nature of documentation when it comes to history.

Most people with hindsight and the sensible few at the time realised that the war in Iraq was unnecessary. Quite a few even realised that the majority of the reason mustered as justification were basically false. So it is hardly surprising that one of George Bush’s aides now basically admits as much.

The revelations are just that, but only because they come from one George W’s circle. Scott McClennan’s statements, coming out in a soon to be published book, lay out what we have all known for a long time.

Bush relied on propaganda “in a way that almost guaranteed that the use of force would become the only feasible option”.

The administration was not “open and forthright on Iraq”.

On the outing of Valerie Plame as a CIA operative and the subsequent coverup, “I allowed myself to be deceived into unknowingly passing along a falsehood”.

The press were too deferential to the White House on Iraq

Steve Hadley, the deputy national security adviser, offered to resign over the erroneous claim that Saddam Hussein was seeking uranium.

“The Iraq war was not necessary”


Conservative Blast

May 28, 2008

People on the right wing of politics around the world annoy me.  The further right the bigger the annoyance.

It seems to me that the conservatives of this world, by their nature, veer off into a closed bubble of self.  The very nature of conservatism is to be introvert.  Amass wealth and superficial sundries.  Look after nobody but yourself.

The further people drift left the more they see the injustice on this tiny planet, the socialist tendency allows facts like:

“Richest 2 Percent Own Half the World’s Wealth.”

…to sink in.

I would go so far as to say most conservatives are so consumed in their own personal bubble that they are beyond caring for anything or anyone who doesn’t in some way come into contact with them.

Superficial actions do not count.

Most people vote based on a surface tension layer of understanding, formed from tabloid red top head lines for the most part.  Xenophobes who think that people worse off than them should not be allowed in to their respective country.  They of course forget that if the positions were reversed they would leave their nation of birth and seek something better.  That of course is irrelevant to them.  Xenophobia creates many of the worlds issues and ruins many lives.  But I again refer to the ‘bubble’.

Let’s not be silly and say everything that is proposed by right wing parties or organisations is sensible.  But the essence of the philosophy is correct.  The morality at the core should speak to a society based on ethics, morality and the good of mankind.

I have little faith in the human race as a whole.  Not to say I haven’t been in my own bubble of self indulgence, but I like to think that I learn from mistakes and evolve in my own understanding of this small planet we all inhabit.  I suppose my urge to study the arts, philosophy and politics in relative depth rather than showbiz, soap and tabloid news stands me in a better stead and I think that is where the general population of the western world falls down.  But I generalise.

I suppose I can sum up by saying that I wish the population of our wide ranging societies would spend less time looking in their own wallets, at their own selfish desires and more to the bigger picture.  You may only have £50 in your bank, but someone else only has £1.  You may want that bigger house or other belonging that you don’t really need. Someone else wants for the means to survive.  Even in your own country.

I recently listened to a podcast that made an impression.

It focused on spending an hour thinking about what you could do without and still be happy.  I think if most people were brutally honest with themselves it would be a lot more than they would initially realise.  We live in an ultra capitalist society here in the west.

Is it really good for us as a species, individuals, on a planet of limited resources?


Paul Thomas Anderson

March 17, 2008

My favourite film maker without a doubt. I have just watched Punch Drunk Love and that sealed my vote even if it wasn’t before. With films like that, Magnolia and There Will Be Blood, well, enough said.

The Iraq War has celebrated it’s 5th birthday. When the war started I was in London, I had disappeared and left my long term girlfirend and Dad for a week spent boozing and being generally off my face with two American women. I was a messed up naive 21 year old and my life was in tatters. I remember I supported the fucked up war. I was naive as I said, and younger than I ever thought my years could be. But I thought I knew everything as does every man that age.

Times change, I am still a fucked up guy, but I have more sense than I did then. What I read I can interpret with more pretentious life experience. I could spout all the statistics I have read about the war, what it costs in lives and money, history, health, oil, contracts and morality. But I don’t need to do that. The justification is there if that’s the way you see things. Or not if you don’t. There are solutions to problems, whichever ones we see fit as a world are the ones that will dictate our level of morality and evolution. Window dressing our responses does nothing other than show that they needed dressing.

New images for the palette.

[singlepic=21,100,75]

[singlepic=22,100,75]


Couple of class things

January 26, 2008

lol, so true.

And this is an excellent article about ‘good people’ and a missing digital camera.

And finally….

The internet of ’96